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Vanderbilt Homes

7 East 95th Street
This New York City home was built between 1914 - 1916. The architect, Grosvenor Atterbury, designed the home for the great granddaughter of Cornelius Vanderbilt, Edith Shepard Fabbri, and her husband, Ernesto Fabbri. It serves as a retreat house, now known as the House of the Redeemer, for the Episcopal Church.
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Belcourt Castle
This Newport, RI estate was constructed between 1891 and 1894 by the architect Richard Morris Hunt, for Oliver Hazard Perry Belmont. The estate is now open for tours. In 1896, Oliver H.P. Belmont married Alva Erskine Smith Vanderbilt, the ex-wife of Oliverís best friend and business partner, William Kissam Vanderbilt. Alva and her son, Harold Sterling Vanderbilt, lived here for many years, preferring this Castle to Marble House. See also: Idle Hour and Marble House.
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Biltmore Estate
This is a good site for external pictures of the architecture.
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Biltmore Estate
This is an online article from Resource Library an online publication of Traditional Fine Arts Organization. Please be sure to click the many embedded links to other articles about the Biltmore and the North Carolina Vanderbilts.
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Biltmore Estate Pathfinder
A wonderful collection of links put together by the University of North Carolina.
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Biltmore House
This Asheville, NC estate is the largest private home that was built in America. Construction took place from 1889 - 1895. It was designed by Richard Morris Hunt for George Vanderbilt and his wife Edith Vanderbilt.
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Biltmore, Asheville, NC
Biltmore is the former home of George Washington Vanderbilt. It was built between 1889 & 1895 by Richard Morris Hunt.
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Breakers
The Breakers in Newport, RI has been preserved and is open for tours. It was built in 1893 when Cornelius Vanderbilt II and his wife Alice Claypoole Gwynne Vanderbilt commissioned architect Richard Morris Hunt to design this grand summer cottage.
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Deepdale
Now known as the "Deepdale Golf Club." (Private, not open to the public.) The Lake Success, NY estate was built by the architects Warren & Wetmore in 1926. Associated family names: William K. Vanderbilt II. Associated institution names: Deepdale Golf Club. To view more estate pictures go to Village Club at Lake Success Click on "our locations." See also: Eagle's Nest.
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Eagle's Nest
This Centerport, NY estate was built between 1910-1931 and was designed primarily by the architects Warren & Wetmore. Now used as a Suffolk County Park. Associated family names: William K. Vanderbilt II.Associated institution names: Vanderbilt Museum, Suffolk County. To view more estate pictures go to Lessing's Vanderbilt Mansion Page. See also: Deepdale.
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Elm Court
This Lenox, MA estate is now a hotel. It was built by William Douglas Sloane and Emily Vanderbilt, and designed by the architects Peabody and Stearns in 1886. In 1919 the estate was the site of the "Elm Court Talks," which led to the creation of The League of Nations and The Treaty of Versailles.
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Florham
This Convent Station, NJ estate is now home to Fairleigh Dickinson University. Hamilton McKown Twombly and his wife, Florence Vanderbilt Twombly commissioned the architects McKim, Mead & White to design this country house in 1897. See also: Vinland.
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Hyde Park
This Hyde Park, NY estate is now part of the National Park Service and is known as the Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site. It was built for Frederick William Vanderbilt and his wife Louise Vanderbilt in 1899 by the architects McKim, Mead & White. See also: Rough Point.
Added by DH

Idle Hour
Home to Dowling College in Oakdale, NY. The current mansion, now known as "Fortunoff Hall," was designed by architect Richard Howland Hunt in 1900-1901. The adjoining Tennis Court and Cloister Wing, now known as the "Kramer Science Center," was designed by the architects Warren & Wetmore in 1902-1904. Associated family names: William K. Vanderbilt, Alva Smith Vanderbilt Belmont, Harold S. Vanderbilt, Consuelo Vanderbilt, William K. Vanderbilt II, Dutch Schultz, and Robert W. Dowling. Associated institution names: Edmund G. & Charles F. Burke, Inc., Peace Haven - headquarters of the Royal Fraternity of Master Metaphysicians, National Dairy Research Labs, Adelphi Suffolk College, Dowling College. To view more estate pictures go to Lessing's Vanderbilt Mansion at Dowling Page. See also: Marble House and Belcourt Castle.
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Marble House
This Newport, RI estate has been preserved and is open for tours. William K. Vanderbilt and his wife, Alva Vanderbilt commissioned Richard Morris Hunt to design and build the "finest cottage money can buy". See also: Idle Hour and Belcourt Castle.
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Rough Point
This Newport, RI estate was completed in 1891 and designed by the architects Peabody & Stearns. It was a summer cottage for Frederick William Vanderbilt and his wife Louise Vanderbilt. See also: Hyde Park.
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Rynwood
Now known as "Banfi Vintners." (Private, not open to the public.) Sometimes referred to as the "Salvage House," this Old Brookville, NY estate was built in 1927 and was designed by architect Roger H. Bullard. Associated family names: Sir Samuel Agar Salvage, Margaret Emerson (Widow of Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt), Frederick W.I. Lundy, and John and Pamela Mariani. Associated institution names: Banfi Vintners. See also: Sagamore Historic Adirondack Great Camp.
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Sagamore Historic Adirondack Great Camp
This Raquette Lake, NY camp is now a National Historic Landmark used for educational and interpretive purposes. It was built from 1895 - 1897 by William West Durant. In 1901 Durant sold the camp to Alfred G. Vanderbilt. Alfred's wife, Margaret Emerson, kept it in the family until 1954. See also: Rynwood.
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Shelburne House
This working farm and estate in Shelburne, VT was designed by the architect Robert H. Robertson from 1888 to 1899. It was the country home of William Seward Webb, and Eliza (Lila) Vanderbilt Webb.
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Vinland
This Newport, RI estate was designed by the architects Peabody and Stearns in 1882. It is now known as McAuley Hall, part of Salve Regina University. In 1896 Hamilton McKnown Twombly and his wife, Florence Vanderbilt Twombly bought the estate as a summer residence. See also: Florham.
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Woodlea
This Scarborough, NY estate is now a country club. (Private, not open to the public.) It was designed by the architects McKim, Mead & White in 1894 for Elliot Fitch Shepard and his wife, Margaret Vanderbilt Shepard. To view more estate pictures go to the Sleepy Hollow Wedding Gallery.
Added by DH